The Holy Spirit of Worship

I was talking to a church member this week who was troubled that a family member viewed the Holy Spirit as a force.  While reading the Nicene Creed, I was struck afresh by the early church's view on God the Spirit.

The Nicene Creed, originally penned in AD 325, was amended in 381.  The whole creed is as follows:
I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible; 
And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, begotten of his Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father; by whom all things were made; who for us men and for our salvation came down from heaven, and was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary, and was made man; and was crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate; he suffered and was buried; and the third day he rose again according to the Scriptures, and ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of the Father; and he shall come again, with glory, to judge both the quick and the dead; whose kingdom shall have no end. 
And I believe in the Holy Ghost the Lord, and Giver of Life, who proceedeth from the Father [and the Son]; who with the Father and the Son together is worshipped and glorified; who spake by the Prophets. 
And I believe one holy Catholic and Apostolic Church; I acknowledge one baptism for the remission of sins; and I look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come. AMEN.
Here's a modern rendition (notes on it can be found here).
We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all that is, seen and unseen. 
We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only son of God, eternally begotten of the Father, God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made, of one being with the Father. Through him all things were made. For us and for our salvation he came down from heaven: by the power of the Holy Spirit he became incarnate from the Virgin Mary, and was made man. For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; he suffered death and was buried. On the third day he rose again in accordance with the Scriptures; he ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father. He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and his kingdom will have no end.  
We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life, who proceeds from the Father [and the Son].  With the Father and the Son he is worshipped and glorified. He has spoken through the Prophets. 
We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church. We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins. We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come. AMEN.
The original question answered by the Nicene Creed was whether Jesus was fully God.  Afterward, the Council of Constantinople convened in 381 to answer the Macedonians.  They taught that the Holy Spirit was not fully God.  The idea is not that the Spirit emanates from the Father and the Son, but that they sent the Holy Spirit.

The creed affirms that the ancient church worshiped and glorified the Holy Spirit "with the Father and the Son together."

To say that He is an It, a non-personal force incapable of receiving our worship would not be in line with ancient Christianity.

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